Short Term Scientific Missions

Susana Marques

Susana Marques

STSM-Coordinator

LNEG – National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Portugal

susana.marques@lneg.pt

Short Term Scientific Missions (STSM) are institutional visits aimed at supporting individual mobility, fostering collaboration between individuals. STSM applicants must be engaged in an official research programme as a PhD Student or postdoctoral fellow or can be employed by, or affiliated to, an institution, organisation or legal entity which has within its remit a clear association with performing research. Financial support may be provided to eligible applicants to carry out STSM that will specifically contribute to the scientific objectives of this COST Action.

STSMs must have a minimum duration of 5 calendar days that includes travel. STSM need to be carried out in their entirety within a single Grant Period and always within the

Action’s lifetime. NOTE: It is possible to change the dates of a successful STSM application if both applicant and host agree. To do so the applicant must contact the STSM coordinator (Susana Marques, susana.marques@lneg.pt) and inform her about the suggested changes.

However, the STSM duration should not be reduced as this is an integral part of the STSM. STSMs that do fall short of the originally specified duration will not be reimbursed the full amount originally allocated.

Applicants

STSM applicants must be engaged in an official research programme as a PhD Student or postdoctoral fellow or can be employed by, or affiliated to, an institution, organisation or legal entity which has within its remit a clear association with performing research. The institutions / organisation or legal entity where applicants pursue their main strand of research are considered as Home Institutions. The Host Institution is the institution/ organisation that will host the successful applicant.

STSM Committee

  • Susana Marques (STSM Coordinator, Portugal)
  • Igor Stuparevic (Croatia)
  • Vladimir Kren (Czech Republic)
  • Martin Rebroš (Slovakia)

STSM Experiences

Logging residue and willow as a substrate for oleaginous yeast

 

STSM Grantee: Belinda Amiti
Home Institution: Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Skopje
Host Institution: Swedish University Of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden
Duration: 12/01/2021 – 13/03/2021

In this work the ability for growth and lipid synthesis of the oleaginous yeast Rhodoturula toruloides SBY29, Rhodoturula toruloides CBS14, Rhodoturula babjevae DVBPG 8058 in logging residue and willow as a substrate was tested. The cultures were inoculated with starting OD600=1 in 10 % and 50 % of hydrolysate and incubated for 5 days at 25 °C. Their growth was followed by OD measurements, lipid accumulation by FT-NIR and sugar consumption by HPLC. The three strains showed growth in 10 % and 50 % of the logging residue. In 10 % of logging residue hydrolysate (Figure 1) SBY29 showed highest growth (OD600=23.5) and CBS14 lowest growth (OD600=16).

Figure 1. Growth of the three strains in 10 % logging residue in shake flasks cultivation

Conducting fermentation of glucose and other hexoses using yeast

STSM Grantee: Dr. Anita Juric
Home Institution: University of Mostar
Host Institution: Bar-Ilan University
Duration: 24/02/2020 – 28/02/2020

Dr. Anita Juric was Grantee for STSM enttitled: Conducting fermentation of glucose and other hexoses using yeast done at Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan (Israel) under supervision of prof. Aharon Gedanken.

Prof. Aharon, in his previous research, has already used soft sonication for conducting fermentation of glucose under these conditions (accelerated fermentation by a factor of 11 as compared with a stand still reaction) but with conventional yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results were published in Energy & Fuels 26, 2352-2356 (2012).  In this research, soft sonication was used for conducting fermentation of brewers spent grain (BSG) by use of non-conventional yeast Candida lipolytica and conventional yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As a control, samples were regularly stirred on the magnetic stirrer. S. cerevisiae, a strain of commercial baker’s yeast procured from a supermarket in Israel and with the aid of yeast Candida lipolytica cultivated at University of Zagreb, Croatia.  BSG was obtained from Hercegovacka brewery located in Bosnia and Herzegovina where BSG is generated from a process using 100% malted barley. The kinetics of the fermentation process is monitored by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as a weight decrease of the fermentation broth because of CO2 release.  A weight decrease of the fermentation broth because of COrelease was determined in both fermentations 13C NMR of sample fermented with S. cerevisiae for 5 h showed peaks of ethanol and rest of the samples needs to be done. Many thanks to prof. Gedanken and his laboratory for nice cooperation and successful work.